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Every iPad has transformed into a Surface in recent years, and as of this week, the iPad Pro and Surface Pro look even more alike.
-- Tom Warren, The Verge

We run the gamut of use cases, in our family. My parents both have iPad Pro's that are their primary computing devices, so of course the keyboards make a lot of sense. Their iPad's also never leave the house. My son and I have older iPad 3's that are simple browsing appliances and, in my case, my Jeep's primary navigation display. Both of our iPads spend as much time out of the house, as in. I think it would be a mistake for Apple to cede the simple use-case market to Amazon.

-- Scrib

...technology can be used for good or for ill. This case is no different.
-- Tim Cook quoted by Stephen Nellis, Reuters

Evidently this technology was used for more ill than good? Anyway, throw this one on the pile of U.S. companies and the NBA (so far) that are falling all over themselves trying to placate the Chinese, without offending their domestic audience (too much).

Related: In 1936 many countries kept their Jewish athletes out of the Summer Olympic Games, so as not to offend the Nazis.

-- Scrib

For years, Apple and Google have allowed companies to bury surveillance features inside the apps offered in their app stores. And both companies conduct their own beacon surveillance through iOS and Android.
-- Michael Kwet, New York Times

I'd like to think that life-long WordPress users are a bit ahead-of-the-game, here, since we have been dealing with suspect apps (Plugins in WordPress-speak) for so long. To be fair, security problems are rarely intentional, but that is why installing any Plugin in WordPress or app on a phone is so dangerous. It is very difficult to perform effective edge testing on these apps, without expertise in the underlying system (WordPress core, Android or iOS).

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Internet television network Netflix (NFLX) late Thursday beat its forecast for new subscribers in the fourth quarter. However, Netflix stock fell in extended trading after the company's guidance disappointed (Investors.com)
Apple Inc. shares fell in Friday trading, after the smartphone manufacturer beat expectations with its latest results but delivered a disappointing forecast (MarketWatch)
On Tuesday, Netflix raised its monthly subscription fees for U.S. members by 13% to 18%, depending on the plan.Analysts said the move will raise average revenue per user, but also is likely to increase subscriber churn in the near term (Investors.com)
The lowest-cost model of the newest iPhone costs no less than $749. Many higher-end models retail for over $1,000. Given that cost differential, one has to expect that Apple will lose more iPhone users in the coming years (Nasdaq.com)
Netflix is switching focus on how it reports its subscribers this year. While investors previously kept watch on Netflix's number of total streaming members, which includes trial memberships, this year the company will make predictions only about paid memberships (CNET.com)
Apple just announced on its earnings call that it will stop reporting unit sales for iPhone, iPad and Mac from next quarter — the start of its next financial year (9to5Mac.com)

I'm sure it's just coincidental.
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Is on point, on several topics, actually. On Apple's market-tanking news:

Now, if Cook is smart – and he is – then he will have overplayed the shock a little now in order to create some good news at the end of the month.

A few of us were talking about this in the office, today. Not about Apple specifically, but how just like the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 that offered companies a golden opportunity to write-down everything they could dig-up, the current bear market is allowing companies across the board, to temper expectations about their Q4 results. It's a free ride! Everybody knows the economy sucks (even though it doesn't) because the market is in the tank. With a company's stock already in the toilet, a CEO would be crazy not to take advantage of lowering expectations, at this point.

Lovejoy's other point, and the main one of his piece, is that Apple needs an SE2:

...if Apple wants to resume growth in the world’s most populous market, it’s going to need to respond...Apple needs something to sit where the iPhone SE did: a modern phone at around the $400 mark.

I might not be the typical iPhone user, but I love the SE (my 80-year old dad loves the big screen and face recognition on the X). Sure, it doesn't have a big sexy screen, but it fits in my pocket and it runs all day on a charge. The camera is workable, if not great, and the performance is more than adequate. Many of the photos on this blog are posted directly from the SE (via Safari, not the WordPress app).

If it happens, will an SE2 be larger than the SE? Sadly, I think it will. But perhaps it will still fit in my pants pockets.

-- Scrib