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A British music tech startup has struck a surprise $70m (£53m) deal to buy Napster, one of the pioneers of the music streaming revolution. The company set up safe studios in London and Los Angeles to enable artists to perform gigs, with fans paying to watch via its app. It has had 100 artists perform virtual reality gigs to date.
-- Mark Sweney, The Guardian

This spike partly reflects a shift in the denominator: digital increased while sales at most physical retail declined, except for groceries. This effect was much stronger in the UK, where lockdown was much deeper. Even so, absolute US ecommerce sales rose 32% in Q2.
-- Benedict Evans

Bad news for restaurants and city centers (and municipal governments beholden to business taxes).

NPC International, which filed for Chapter 11 in July, announced an agreement Monday with Pizza Hut's owner Yum! Brands to close roughly a quarter of its restaurants and sell the remaining locations. Specific restaurants and timing have not yet been determined, but NPC said a "substantial majority" of affected locations have dining rooms.
-- KITV-4 Honolulu

The appeals court found that Amazon played a pivotal role in every step of plaintiff Angela Bolger’s purchase of a replacement laptop battery from Amazon third-party seller Lenoge Technology HK Ltd, which was operating under the fictitious name "E-Life." Bolger alleged that the battery burst into flames while she balanced the laptop on her thighs, resulting in severe burns to her arms, legs and feet.
-- Lisa Baertlein, Reuters

Related:
Amazon can be held liable for third-party seller products

"No matter if it’s India, Southeast Asia or the Americas, there will be a manufacturing ecosystem in each," Liu told investors on a conference call, adding that while China will still play a key role in Foxconn's manufacturing empire, the country's "days as the world's factory are done."
-- Debby Wu, Bloomberg

However, the "Nintendo is Disney" thesis is deeply flawed. It feels more like a desire to apply a pattern than to find a real analogue. Elements of Nintendo certainly represent Disney, but they represent Disney insofar as both companies are best in class creators of four-quadrant, multi-generational content. Otherwise the businesses are fundamentally different, their management styles fundamentally different, and their approaches to content itself are fundamentally different, too.
-- Matthew Ball

Related:
Even in a recession Nintendo firing on all cylinders